NANOTECHNOLOGIES: A PRELIMINARY RISK ANALYSIS ON THE BASIS OF A WORKSHOP ORGANIZED IN BRUSSELS ON 1–2 MARCH 2004 BY THE HEALTH AND CONSUMER PROTECTION DIRECTORATE GENERAL OF THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION

Publication Date : 2004
Code : 151132
242 Visited Entry Date : 2016/12/06

International

English
Volume 143
Document type Event Report
Subject Risk Assessment and Management
Summary
Nanotechnologies refer to “technologies of the tiny”. They span domains as diverse as computing, material science, medicine, energy production and storage, etc., bring together fields as varied as physics, chemistry, genetics, information and communication technologies, and cognitive sciences, and should become virtually ubiquitous before long. Nanotechnologies are with us already. Indeed, consumers are already being offered products manufactured with nanotechnologies including cosmetics, clothing, and sporting goods. But, while technology and market analysts alike expect the very small to become very big, nanotechnologies are still emerging. Like other new technologies before them, nanotechnologies may not only present potential benefits, but also potential risks. Today therefore constitutes an appropriate time to establish a dialog on nanotechnologies involving scientists, consumers, workers, industrialists, and other stakeholders. Today also represents an opportune moment to reflect on the implications of these “technologies of the tiny” for public health, health and safety at work, and the environment. Today presents us with a unique chance to set nanotechnologies on a responsible development trajectory, one that will benefit both human and environmental health and global competitiveness. The “Mapping out Nano Risks” workshop represents a modest first step—albeit an important one—towards analyzing the potential risks of nanotechnologies and what they may imply. Consequently, I should like to thank all the experts who took part in the workshop for contributing written statements prior to the workshop, for actively participating in the workshop, and for producing this timely report.
Content
FOREWORD
LIST OF WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
INTRODUCTION
PART 1: WORKSHOP OUTCOMES
1. PRELIMINARY RISK ANALYSIS 
1.1. Overview 
1.1.1 Hazard identification 
1.1.1.1 Clarifications
1.1.1.2 Concerns
1.1.1.2.1 Toxicology and ecotoxicology 
1.1.1.2.2 Ethics 
1.1.1.2.3 Security 
1.1.1.3 Limits 
1.1.2 Policy options evoked during the meeting 
1.1.3 Twelve recommendations fromexperts at the workshop 
1.2. Options for future policies identified by the workshop secretariat 
2. GENERAL STATEMENT ON NANOTECHNOLOGIES 
3. CONCEPT NOTE ON A HAZARD TRIGGERALGORITHM AS A POTENTIAL PRIORITIZATION TOOL FOR USE BY REGULATORS 

PART 2: DOCUMENTS PRODUCED AND CIRCULATED PRIOR TO 1 MARCH 2004
1. COLLECTION OF SHORT CONTRIBUTIONS BY THE INVITED EXPERTS 

Security Problems from Nanotechnology Jürgen Altmann
Moving the nanoscience and technology (NST) debate forwards Short-term impacts, long-term uncertainty and the social constitution Alexander Arnall* and Douglass Parr**
A need for integrated testing of products in Nanotechnology Paul J.A. Borm and Wolfgang Kreyling 
Engineered anomaterials and risks: One perspective Vicki Colvin
Mapping Out Nano Risks. Some considerations on possible toxicity W.H. de Jong 
Complexity and Uncertainty A Prudential Approach To Nanotechnology Jean-Pierre Dupuy 
Nano Ethics Primer Göran Hermerén
Nanotechnology - From the insurers' perspectiveAnnabelle R. Hett 
A briefing note on Nanoparticles C.Vyvyan Howard 
Mapping Out Nano Risks Lutz Mädler 
Social Imagination for NanotechnologyAlfred Nordmann 
Emerging Concepts in Nanoparticle (NP) Toxicology G. Oberdörster
“Mapping Out Nano Risks” M.A.Pierotti 
Mapping out Nano Risks Jos Put 
Public Perception of Nanotechnology Ortwin Renn 
Risks and Ethical Challenges of Nanotechnology in Healthcare D.G. Rickerby
Towards an ap Towards an appropriate corporate and public governance of Nano Risks : 
Promoting and Promoting and strengthening a multilateral approach Françoise Roure 
Nanotechnolo Nanotechnology and its implications M E Welland 
2. TERMS OF R 
2. TERMS OF REFERENCE 

3. AGENDA
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